Why PAT Test?

INSPECTION & TESTING OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Electrical appliances start off perfectly safe, but with use can deteriorate to an extent where there is a risk of an electrical shock or a fire. Just as regular MOT checks ensure the safety of cars of the road, Portable Appliance Testing (or PAT to use the popular acronym) ensures that electrical appliances continue to be safe to use.

For example, a vacuum cleaner would be used heavily in a school or a hotel. In time it is likely that the cable may start pulling out of the plug or the wire could start fraying.

If a system of maintenance is not set up where these types of faults are picked up and put right it is very likely that someone would get an electric shock.

Wharfedale PAT Testing

BUSINESS INSURANCE

Increasingly, Insurance companies are stipulating Portable Appliance Testing as a necessary condition of insurance on most businesses. If there was a fire and the management in a company could not show that regular PAT testing had been carried out, some insurance companies could take this into account when arriving at settlement figures.

In addition, there are a number of Health & Safety regulations that are in place to protect employees from danger. These imply directly or indirectly that employers have to ensure that electrical appliances do not cause any danger to staff.

THE LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PORTABLE APPLIANCE TESTING

The IET Code of Practice for In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment was updated in 2020 when the 5th Edition was published. It contains the relevant legislation regarding electrical maintenance and identifies how the law requires equipment to be properly maintained.

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

Places a duty of care upon both employer (sections 2, 3 and 4 etc) and employees (section 7) to ensure the safety of all persons using the work premises. This includes the self-employed.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

State that: “Every employer shall make a suitable and sufficient assessment of:
a. the risks to the health and safety of their employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work, and
b. the risks to the health and safety of persons not in their employment arising out of or in connection with the conduct by them of his undertaking”. (Regulation 3(1)).

The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER)

Employers shall ensure that work equipment is so constructed that it is suitable for the use to which it is put.

PUWER covers most risks that can result from using work equipment. With respect to risks from electricity, compliance with the Electricity at Work Regulations 1998 is likely to achieve compliance with PUWER regulations 5-9, 19 and 22.

PUWER only applies to work equipment used by workers at work. This includes all work equipment (fixed, portable or transportable) connected to a source of electrical energy. PUWER does not apply to the fixed installations in a building. The electrical safety of these installations is dealt with only by the Electricity at Work Regulations.

Regulation 4 of PUWER requires the employer to ensure that equipment is only used for operations and under conditions for which it is suitable. Regulations 6 also includes the requirement for records of maintenance activities be kept.

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 (EAWR)

These regulations are very relevant to the use of electrical appliances at work. They require electrical systems to be maintained so that they remain safe during use. This refers to everything electrical in the workplace, from the wiring in the building to the electrical appliances.

Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

These regulations require that every employer shall ensure that the workplace equipment, devices and systems are maintained. This includes keeping the equipment, devices and systems in efficient working order and in good repair.

The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016

If a product carries a CE mark it can be deemed to satisfy the European safety requirements and when new, will be safe to use. The regulations also apply to hire agreements or sold as second-hand.

Responsibilities

Everyone at work has responsibilities including, in certain circumstances, trainees. However, the all-embracing responsibilities of all persons to help ensure electrical safety in the workplace does not minimise the duties of particular persons. Regulation 3 of the Electricity at Work Regulations recognises a responsibility (control) that employers and many employees have for electrical systems.

“It shall be the duty of every employer and the self-employed person to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control.

It shall be the duty of every employee while at work:
a. To co-operate with his employer so far as is necessary to enable any placed on that employer by the provisions of these Regulations to be complied with; and
b. To comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far that as they relate to matters which are within his control”.

The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 requires every employer to ensure that equipment is suitable for the use for which it is provided (Regulation 4(1)) and only used for work for which it is suitable (Regulation 4(3)). They require every employer to ensure equipment is maintained in good order (Regulation 5) and inspected as necessary to ensure it is maintained in a safe condition (Regulation 6).

Users of Equipment

Users of equipment have responsibilities too, which include ensuring the equipment they use has no obvious visual damage or defects. Users should be instructed to remove from service and report any defective equipment.

Maintenance

Regulation 4(2) of the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 states:“As may be necessary to prevent danger, all systems shall be maintained so as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, such danger.”

Regulation 5 of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 states:“Every employer shall ensure that work equipment is maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and good repair.” (‘efficient’ relates to how the condition of the equipment might affect health and safety; it is not concerned with productivity.)

Inspection

The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 include a specific requirement that where the safety of work equipment depends on installation conditions, and where conditions of work are liable to lead to deterioration, the equipment shall be inspected (Regulation 6).

State: “Every employer shall ensure that work equipment is so constructed or adapted as to be suitable for the purpose for which it is used or provided”. (Regulation 4(1)).

At Wharfedale PAT Testing we keep up to date with the very latest regulations which is why all our employees have studied IETs latest In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment Regulations, which was update in 2020 – 5th Edition.

Wharfedale PAT Testing
Wharfedale PAT Testing
Wharfedale PAT Testing
Wharfedale PAT Testing
Wharfedale PAT Testing
Wharfedale PAT Testing

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Get in Touch

We’re fully insured and qualified with City & Guilds Level 3 in PAT Testing.

Please email or call us with any questions, or to confirm a time to suit you.

07590 652382

01943 511479

matthew@wharfedalepattesting.co.uk

Get in Touch

We’re fully insured and qualified with City & Guilds Level 3 in PAT Testing.

Please email or call us with any questions, or to confirm a time to suit you.

07590 652382

01943 511479

matthew@wharfedalepattesting.co.uk

9 + 13 =